Posted by: ljubica | June 29, 2008

Hunza’s Diet – Going Back to Basics

Written by; social anthropologist Dr. Julie Flowerday who has lived and worked extensively in the Hunza Valley. Her e-mail is flowerda@email.unc.edu.
Marta Luchsinger, who coordinated production of the recipe book, visited Hunza as a doctoral student at the University of Bath.
Mareile Paley is a graphic designer who lives in Hong Kong with her husband, free-lance photographer Matthieu Paley (http://www.paleyphoto.com/).
This article appeared on pages 34-43 of the May/June 2006 print edition of Saudi Aramco World.

Left: A woman uses a wood-fueled stove inside her home in the town of Karimabad. Right: Rice does not grow at Hunza’s altitude, but wheat thrives, and it provides the staple grain of Hunza cuisine.
So it is that the “traditional” underlies life-shaping experiences. The Karimabad women thus added something of their life histories to the recipes we collected through their fierce labors of love, which have made generations of women and their fathers, husbands, brothers, sons and daughters happy and well-nourished. We, in collecting these recipes, and you, in recreating them, honor the cultural heritage of the unspoken heroes and heroines of Hunza.
—Julie Flowerday
Wheat is Hunza’s main staple food. Rice, otherwise so common in Asia, cannot be grown in the mountainous terrain and high-altitude climate, and so different breads and wheat-based dishes replace it. Other grains such as buckwheat and barley are also cultivated.

Maltash is “aged butter,” prepared from milk that is scalded before churning. Its strong taste is so valued that maltash is a gift for births, weddings and funerals—taxes can even be paid in maltash. The older the maltash, the more valuable it is. Wrapped in birch bark and buried in the ground,it may lie for years or even decades before the head of the family decides it is time to dig it out.

Kurutz is a salty, sour, rock-hard cheese that is a favorite soup flavoring. It is made by boiling down lassi (see page 43), together with a piece of older kurutz that gets the enzymes started, as in sourdough bread. The resulting soft pasteis pressed and sun-dried. Similar cheese is made from Mongolia to Tibet.

Dried apricots are a favorite snack and an ingredient for soups and juices. The valley is known for its abundance of apricots, most of which are collected in late summer to dry in the sun on rooftops, walls and boulders.

Apricot kernels are very similar to almonds in taste and used in much the same way, as a snack and for cooking. Children often crack the hard shell of the apricot pits with a stone to get to the delicious kernel.
Apricot oil is traditionally extracted from the kernels by hand, though machines are slowly replacing the hand-work. There’s a sweet and a bitter apricot oil: The sweet is for cooking; the bitter is a beauty product for skin and hair.
Tumuro is a native wild thyme which is found in the mountains surrounding the valley. It is used freshand dried.
Coriander is not native to Hunza, but it grows easily in the harsh climate, and it is a very popular herb to season soups andmeat dishes.
Turmeric usually comesas a bright yellow powder and is also a favorite import. It is mainly used in small quantities to color soups and other dishes.

Wheat is Hunza’s main staple food. Rice, otherwise so common in Asia, cannot be grown in the mountainous terrain and high-altitude climate, and so different breads and wheat-based dishes replace it. Other grains such as buckwheat and barley are also cultivated.
Maltash is “aged butter,” prepared from milk that is scalded before churning. Its strong taste is so valued that maltash is a gift for births, weddings and funerals—taxes can even be paid in maltash. The older the maltash, the more valuable it is. Wrapped in birch bark and buried in the ground,it may lie for years or even decades before the head of the family decides it is time to dig it out.
Kurutz is a salty, sour, rock-hard cheese that is a favorite soup flavoring. It is made by boiling down lassi (see page 43), together with a piece of older kurutz that gets the enzymes started, as in sourdough bread. The resulting soft pasteis pressed and sun-dried. Similar cheese is made from Mongolia to Tibet.
Dried apricots are a favorite snack and an ingredient for soups and juices. The valley is known for its abundance of apricots, most of which are collected in late summer to dry in the sun on rooftops, walls and boulders.
Apricot kernels are very similar to almonds in taste and used in much the same way, as a snack and for cooking. Children often crack the hard shell of the apricot pits with a stone to get to the delicious kernel.
Apricot oil is traditionally extracted from the kernels by hand, though machines are slowly replacing the hand-work. There’s a sweet and a bitter apricot oil: The sweet is for cooking; the bitter is a beauty product for skin and hair.
Tumuro is a native wild thyme which is found in the mountains surrounding the valley. It is used freshand dried.
Coriander is not native to Hunza, but it grows easily in the harsh climate, and it is a very popular herb to season soups andmeat dishes.
Turmeric usually comesas a bright yellow powder and is also a favorite import. It is mainly used in small quantities to color soups and other dishes.
Bread Staple Food of Hunza’s
Hunza’s ubiquitous chappati is actually a culinary import from the south. Really traditional Hunza bread is a thin wheat bread known as the khamali. Compared to a chappati, it is much larger in diameter, and the reason was practical: Wood for cooking fires is precious, and by baking a large piece of bread you can take advantage of the heat on the rather large cooking plate of a traditional Hunza stove.

Phitti is probably the most famous of all Hunza breads and a common breakfast food. Thick and nutritious, with a crusty outside and a soft interior, it is time-consuming to prepare: The dough is put into a sealed metal container, and after all the other cooking has been done at night, the phitti is tucked into the embers of the hearth, where it bakes overnight.

Diltar The Refreshing Yogurt Drink
People call it buttermilk, lassi or simply a yogurt drink. Traditionally, diltar is prepared in a goat- or sheep skin which is shaken or rolled on the ground until butter forms. An alternate method uses a tall, narrow wooden cylinder and a long, thick pole in a process much like churning butter. Nowadays, the simplest way to make diltar is to mix yogurt with an equal amount of water and blend at high speed for a few minutes. Add salt, sugar or fruits like bananas or mangos as you please.

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Posted by: ljubica | June 29, 2008

14 Days to Better Health

http://www.serenityforyou.freelife.com/pop/dsp_04_002_GoChi_Interview.html

Ponce De Leon once fought fierce battles with native tribes out of ignorance looking for The Fountain of Youth . Today, like Ponce De Leon, Baby Boomers are fighting their own battle searching for the Fountain of youth not out of ignorance, but out of necessity.
Nip /Tuck plastic surgery can smooth out wrinkled faces, reshape our features and add years to our appearance. Looking younger is a priority for most Americans, and the demand for plastic surgery is on the rise.

Americans, the wealthiest nation in the world can afford the cost of plastic surgeries, but according to the World Health Organization rank amongst the sickest nations in the world. Faced with the gloom and doom of the impending health crisis we jump onto the newest anti aging trend that promises to turn back the clock of time.

With our busy and hectic lives we have no time to eat right. We choose our food according to convenience, so we pop the vitamin pills hoping to compensate for the lack of a healthy balanced diet. Our shelves are lined with vitamins, lotions and potions, some that only benefit marketing companies and our failing health is on the rise.

Perhaps there is no Fountain of Youth in the tradition of the term. However, when it comes to longevity and anti aging we have lots to learn from less developed cultures like Himalayan people, for they are as close to the Fountain of Youth as it comes in terms of health and longevity.

Himalayas – where the highest mountains in the world are, is the place where the natural medicine originated. The pristine environment, which has soil that is incredibly rich in minerals upturned ions ago, is the place full of many exotic plants including a tiny red berry called Goji. The Natural Science Institute discovered a region called the “Hunza Valley” in a remote area of Indo China ’ where living up to the age of 120 is not uncommon.

The scientists took special interest in the Hunza people when they observed that Hunzas not only lived long lives, but their long lives are healthy, virtually free from pain and illness, their vision is sharp, at the age of 80 have no gray hair, they have boundless energy and strength and their minds are clear.
In their language you won’t find the words for illnesses that have become all to familiar in our western world.
You might be wondering what kind of exotic foods might be contributing to their longevity and health. Their secret to long and healthy lives is contributed to a combination of factors.

  • The Hunza’s live in remote isolated place away from pollution and harmful stress of modern civilization.
  • They practice daily art of relaxation and energy management with deep rhythmic breathing techniques and meditations.
  • Their life style provides for the exercises of strength and endurance.

Hunza’s daily food consumption consists of;

  • Fresh fruits and vegetables such as;  string beans, peas, carrots, turnip, squash, spinach, lettuce, apples, pears, peaches, apricots, apricot pits, cherries and blackberries and Goji berries.
  • Their staple food is whole grains such as barley, buckwheat, millet and wheat and yogurt.
  • Milk and cheese is their main source of protein. Meat is consumed only on special occasion. Chicken being the most common.
  • Their special bread, called chapatti is served with every meal. Chapatti is made from non refined whole flour of either barley, buckwheat, millet or wheat.

Hunzas eat only two meals a day. The first meal is served at twelve noon. This may sound surprising, since Hunzas engage in demanding physical labor all morning long on an empty stomach. The truth is that these people eat very little. Their average daily diet totals about 1.900 calories daily, while an average USA citizen according to USDA consumes about 3,300 calories daily.

Observers reported to their amazement seeing men in their 80’s, 90’s and above lifting heavy rocks and boulders building their terraced gardens, and joining in games of strength and endurance with opponents half their age. They have been astounded by seeing these 80 year old men exercise by digging holes in the ice and swimming under the ice with the endurance and strength of 30 year old men.

Another contributing factor to Hunza’s health is that their medical system is based on preserving health. Their daily consumption of healing foods and herbs helps to prevent illness from occurring in the first place.

The direct opposite to our pharmaceutical oriented system which appears to have a little interest in keeping us healthy. In fact, their very livelihood depends upon us being sick.

Modern day doctors may look at the Hunza people and dismiss them as a primitive and unsophisticated culture. Yet, how sophisticated can we be if our society is plagued by illnesses that shorten our lives, or worse, prolong pain and suffering?

After reading this you might be tempted to pack up and join the Hunza people. The good news is, you don’t have to join the Hunza’s in search of a Fountain of Youth, but you might have to look beyond your average supermarket for fresh, natural unprocessed and unaltered food.

  • Simplify your lifestyle. Find time for to exercise, relax and find something to be passionate about.
  • If you are buying your produce from the supermarket, then make sure that you supplement your food with whole food products.
  • Eat dark green leafy vegetables such as broccoli, brussels sprouts, kale, spinach and collard greens.
  • Brightly colored fruits and veggies loaded with antoxidants such as, red and yellow peppers, squash, beet root, tomatoes, oranges, plums, apricots, and berries.
    If there is something that we can learn from Himalayan people, it is that taking care of your health starts long before any signs of illness appear.Remember that health is your most precious commodity, and that sound healthy life practices applied over a lifetime is the real “Fountain of Youth”

On Oprah Show, Dr. Mehmet Oz, regarded as a professional in the field of nutrition and anti aging gives advice to Ben Gordon of Chicago Bulls on high energy food

Posted by: ljubica | April 26, 2008

4,000 Year Old Secret to Health Revealed

Imagine: Delicious, mouth watering juice… that travels thru your veins, muscles, tissues, and bones …directing your cells to heal your body on its own…supporting your immune system…increasing your energy and strength…melting away your stress. Science fiction? Science, Yes! Fiction, No!

Dear Friend, This product is for real and it comes from a tiny red fruit called Goji. Goji in Himalayas, on top of the world absorbing the sun’s powerful energy , in soil that is incredibly rich in minerals, upturned from deep within the earth eons ago.

Goji is jam packed with powerful nutrients that will renew your life and supercharge your health.

Goji’s health benefits have been enjoyed for 4,000 years by the Himalayan people who were the first natural healers. Their traditions have been passed on since the very beginning of civilization and now to you.

It is not uncommon for Himalayan people to live 100 years or more virtually free from pain and illness. Their vision is sharp, and they have boundless energy and strength. Their language doesn’t even have words for many health conditions we experience in our world. The secret of their health is the daily consumption of a tiny red berry called Goji.

How Goji works?

Goji Polysaccharides
Scientists found out that the Goji of Himalayan origin contains astronomical levels of unique bio-active saccharides, a family of complex carbohydrates that defends the body against illness, pollutants and free radicals.

These unique polysaccharides known as LBP’s or Lycium Barbarum Polysaccharides can’t be found in any other food on earth, they are totally unique to the goji berry.

Polysaccharides are not vitamins, minerals, amino acids or enzymes, but they are in a class of their own. They are often referred to as the “missing link” between what we eat and what our bodies need for optimal functioning. The scientists and nutritionists are just beginning to understand complex role these sugars play in our body.

The polysaccharides impact your health by the complex role that they play in the body. Their main role is facilitating cell to cell communication.

When cell to cell communication brakes down we get sick. By adding Goji to your daily diet you are preventing breakdown in cellular communication and supplying your body with nutrients, minerals and powerful antioxidants.

It is natural not to focus on consequences of poor nutrition, but I urge you to start preventative care of your health NOW.

By adding goji to your regular diet you are providing your body with the highly boiavailable nutrition in the form of polysaccharides, supporting your immune system with most nutrient dense food on earth.

So don’t waste another minute get your GoChi now  at http://www.goji-passion.com   and try it for 90 days.

 

 

Phone orders call toll free  1-800-882-7240
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With our 90 day empty bottle return policy there is absolutely nothing to lose. We will give you 90 days to try a case or 4 bottles of GoChi or our original Himalayan goji juice. If for any reason you are less than thrilled with the product after 90 days you may return  the empty bottles for a full refund. No questions asked.  

 

Posted by: ljubica | April 26, 2008

Dear Reader,

Please know that it’s not an accident that you came upon this web page. If you agree with me that health is our most precious commodity then you owe it to yourself to find how you too can improve your health and the quality of your life.

I was someone who was always so busy taking care of my business and my kids that I did not even have time to eat right.

 By late afternoon I was so tired that I simply could not function and had to take a nap or drink coffee just to keep going.

Shortly after I  started drinking this product I was amazed at energy level and well being I experienced. I am even able to take daily power walks,  and my kids say Mom is fun again.

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